Earth Day Network Blog Updates

A Bright New Day for School Lighting

“They say the neon lights are bright on Broadway,” but last week the lights were a little brighter not at a theatre in New York, but at a school in Fall River, Massachusetts.

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The largest solar power plant in the world

In the race towards solving climate change, renewable energy alternatives such as solar technology have been an important priority. With countries striving to create new, better and more efficient ways to lower the world carbon footprint, the United States has taken a giant leap forward. On October 25th, the Obama Administration announced the approval of what is said to be the largest concentrated solar power plant in the world. The plant will use a parabolic trough system so that energy radiated from the sun will collect into tubes.

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Impressive Turnout to MillionTreesNYC’s 2010 Fall Planting Day, a Component of the Avatar Home Tree Initiative

On October 22 and 23, 2010, over 1,500 volunteers flocked to sites all over New York City, from Brooklyn, to Queens, to Staten Island, to plant 20,000 trees, coordinated by MillionTreesNYC.

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Progress on the international front: Biological Diversity

2010 is the UN’s Year of Biodiversity, and it is only fitting that this year (this past week in fact), 193 countries made real progress in the effort to protect the biodiversity we have left. Nagoya, Japan hosted the 10th conference on the Convention on Biological Diversity and the delegates unanimously agreed to the Nagoya Protocol- an effort to slow species extinction worldwide.

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Vote Green

In the U.S. today, we have the opportunity to change our future by electing new officials and choosing new laws which will have a bearing on whether we protect our environment, our health, our communities, and our planet.

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“Crossing the Aisle” For a Better Tomorrow

As we face the fallout of this week’s United States elections, the environmental community begins to consider the next focal point of the Obama Administration. With the legislative bodies in the government now divided – Democrats controlling a slim margin in the Senate and a Republican majority in the House – will there be any attempt at serious movement on the climate change agenda?

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A Woolly World

I dreamt, the other night, that I was a Woolly Mammoth. I was being chased across the frozen tundra by a band of humans. It was an odd dream, to be sure, and I’m not quite sure why I had it. Probably this cold snap we’ve just come out of. The heat wasn’t yet on in my house, and so to keep warm I dug my big, fuzzy brown blanket out of the closet. I was lucky enough to wake up before the humans caught up to me, otherwise I’m sure I would’ve been a mammoth burger.

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Bay Area Schools Get "Home" Trees

Last Saturday, the campuses of Dr.

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National Security and the Environment

As we observe Veterans Day 2011, Earth Day Network is honored to work with veterans for their service and sacrifice. This year we had the distinct honor of working with committed individuals from Operation Free and retired Generals such as General Wesley Clark to pursue a clean energy future.  Among the many reasons to support clean energy, national security is a key concern for EDN and many of its members.

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Sunburned Whales?

The ozone layer, which helps shield ultraviolet rays from entering the atmosphere, has been consistently thinning over the years. A new study concludes that this effect is causing some whale species off the coast of Mexico to show signs of severe sunburn. Because whales need to spend a vast amount of time on the ocean’s surface to breathe, they are increasingly vulnerable. Certain whale species are more susceptible to these damages. Like humans, lighter-skinned whales are more vulnerable to the sun, for example the Blue Whale, the largest mammal on the planet.

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