Earth Day Network Blog Updates

Goodbye, Aaron Swartz. The Fight for Openness Continues.

Almost a week ago, the world lost one of the most amazing and effective voices for democracy on the Internet. His name was Aaron Swartz, and he was a computer programmer, writer, political organizer and activist. Aaron was one of the cofounders of the website Reddit and co-authored the RSS standard.

Read More

EDN Launches Student Carpooling Campaign in India

Earth Day Network has a fun new campaign to promote carpooling among students in India: Backseat Buddies!  

In India, not all primary and secondary schools have buses. Backseat Buddies encourages students from the same locality to travel together to and from school, instead of traveling in individual cars. This not only cuts down on carbon pollution and conserves resources, it helps to allieviate the severe traffic congestion in many Indian cities.

Read More

A Win for Wind

As part of the recent fiscal cliff deal, Congress has authorized an extension of the Wind Production Tax Credit (PTC), a move that was applauded by renewable energy advocates all over the country. 

Read More

Letter to Obama: Raise Your Voice, Use Executive Authority

Earth Day Network joined dozens of environmental and health organizations to send a letter to President Obama asking him to take serious steps to stop climate change during his second term.

The full text of the letter is below:

Read More

Earth Day Network Plants 350,000 Trees in Uganda

Earth Day Network completed a tree-planting project in central Uganda today that saw 350,000 trees planted in three high-poverty districts: Kiboga-Kyankwanzi, Kayunga and Kamuli.

Read More

Renewables Are Winning, and You Can Help

By Kathleen Rogers and Danny Kennedy

In a year when the election was dominated by fossil fuel propaganda and both candidates for President failed to mention climate change on the campaign trail, it's hard to say "we're succeeding." However, the trends are clear: An enormous shift has begun in the ways in which the United States and the world will power itself with clean energy.

To understand what we're talking about, consider this fact:

Read More

EDN-India Holds Forum on Green Space in Crowded Cities

India, the second most populous country in the world, has several cities where the pressure of population and construction has resulted in very little green cover. Kolkata is one of these cities. On December 5, Earth Day Network – India, in collaboration with the American Center, Kolkata, and the NGO Center for Contemporary Communication (CCC) hosted a discussion on this topic called “Policies and Land Use for Public Parks and Gardens in Big Cities.” 

Read More

UN Climate Conference Falls Short, Very Short

For the past two weeks, heads of state gathered in Doha, Qatar, for the 18th Conference of the Parties (COP-18) organized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). This annual conference brings together representatives from every country in the world to negotiate how the global community will respond to the dangers associated with climate change.

Read More

New York State PTA Passes PVC Phase Out Resolution

Last week in Saratoga Springs, NY, the New York State Parent Teacher Association passed a resolution calling for the phase out of PVC in schools statewide. This follows similar resolutions recently passed by New York State United Teachers, the American Public Health Association, and United University Professions.

Polyvinyl chloride is the third most widely produced plastic in the world. You can find it in pipes, clothing and signs, to name a few of its applications.

Read More

Permafrost Thaw Will Intensify Climate Change, says UNEP

As winter approaches and temperatures drop in the northern hemisphere, we’re more easily distracted from the effects of climate change in our planet’s colder regions. But this should be sobering: The United Nations Environment Programme released a report today about how the thawing of permafrost will cause additional climate change across the globe, as early as 2100.

Read More

Syndicate content