Extreme weather events

The frequency of extreme weather events around the world is increasing. This spring saw the West Coast of the United States ravaged by extreme flooding after hot temperatures followed a heavy winter snowfall. An early summer heat-wave in Europe broke records and ignited wildfires across the region. Sudan is in the midst of a humanitarian crisis after being hit by severe drought and resulting famine. All around the world, weather events are making the lives of millions more difficult and dangerous.

While climate change is often seen as an increase in average global temperature, we can see that much more drastic fluctuations impact specific locations. Increased temperatures accelerate evaporation and build up water vapor in the atmosphere, resulting in intense precipitation events such as sudden hail and flash floods. Science says that the likelihood of extreme weather events will continue to rise. This means that 500-year floods will probably occur every 100 years, then every ten; while acute heat waves and droughts become the norm.

A few weeks ago, President Trump publicly stated he was beginning the formal process of withdrawing from the Paris Agreement which for the first time in history brought 195 countries together to solve climate change. With this, the US would join Syria and Nicaragua as the globe’s only climate outliers.

What You Can Do About It:

Call: If you’re anywhere in the US, let your Congress person know we can’t let this happen. Calling beats emailing, so pick up the phone. Go to callmycongress.com to find specific numbers for you to call. And remember, you elected them. They want to hear from you!

Learn: Educate yourself and your children. Earth Day Network works year round to bring climate education to every student worldwide and to give people of all ages the skills to understand the complex challenges of climate change and how to live sustainably. You can download your free toolkit here.

Track: Track severe weather to keep yourself and your family safe. Visit NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center.

Support: Earth Day Network needs your help to keep fighting for climate safety and a sustainable planet. Please donate.